Tahr book your hunt in New Zealand

About New Zealand Tahr

The Himalayan Tahr, originally from the areas around Tibet, were introduced to the Southern Alps of the South Island of New Zealand around 1904 to 1906. Initially considered a pest, the New Zealand government controlled the Tahr herds with government sharpshooters and aircraft. Over the last twenty years, the Tahr hunting status has changed from being unwanted pests to a manageable, renewable and valuable resource to many local and overseas trophy hunters.

The Tahr is a majestic animal found on hillside rocky book your hunt outcroppings with their long “lion like” mane blowing in the wind. This is truly a majestic sight. When put to chase, the Tahr hunter will be in awe of their climbing abilities in the steep New Zealand Alpines they call home.

The Himalayan Tahr is close relative to the free range mountain goat. A Tahr has relatively short legs and small head with large eyes and small pointed ears. Their hooves have a flexible, rubbery core that allows them to grip smooth rocks, while a hard sharp rim can lodge into small footholds. Tahr inhabits steep broken mountainous landscapes ranging from 3000′ to 8000′ above sea level. Males are much larger and have different coloration and horn structure than the females. Adult Himalayan Tahr can weigh from 300 to 400 pounds and stand 2½ to 3 feet tall. The nannies (females) only weigh 45-55 pounds. This is one of the largest “pair” ratio differences between any mammals in the world. Himalayan Tahr are herbivores, subsisting on tall alpine “tussock” grasses and shrubs. Himalayan Tahr can be book your hunt found in herds from 2-25 animals and can live up to 14 years old in the wild.

What makes a Trophy Bull Tahr?

A Bull Tahr has horn bases of 8-9″ and a sharp round curled horn of 10 to 14 inches. A Tahr Hunter will judge a good trophy male by its long mane as well as its horns although record book your hunt book scoring only uses a combination of the base horn diameter and length of both horns. Most Tahr hunting guides will look for horns over 11 inches in length. Tahr horns of 12.5 to 13.5 inches are considered an above “trophy” average and horns over 14″ are exceptional. There have been a few New Zealand Tahr taken with horns over 15″ and these usually fall into the SCI Top 10 Record Category.

When should I plan my Tahr Hunting Trip?

Like Chamois hunting, Tahr Hunting can be done year. The ideal time to hunt Tahr is during New Zealand’s late fall and winter. By Tahr hunting in winter, the Tahr will have their winter coats and manes. A Tahr’s mane can grow 5-8″ in length from February to early June and turn darker in color. Late book your hunt May, June, July and August are ideal months to hunt Tahr and chamois. The Tahr rut runs late May thru July which usually correlates with the first snow of the season. The rut is an excellent time for Bow hunting. Tahr can be hunted in conjunction with the red stag “roar” or rut in March and April but the hunter will have to work harder to find a Tahr with a long mane at that time of year. The coats will also be lighter in color before winter sets in.

About New Zealand Tahr The Himalayan Tahr, originally from the areas around Tibet, were introduced to the Southern Alps of the South Island of New Zealand around 1904 to 1906. Initially considered a pest, the New Zealand government controlled the Tahr herds with government sharpshooters and aircraft. Over the last twenty years, the Tahr hunting status has changed from being unwanted pests to a manageable, renewable and valuable resource to many local and overseas trophy hunters. The Tahr is a majestic animal found on hillside rocky book your hunt outcroppings with their long “lion like” mane blowing in the wind. This is truly a majestic sight. When put to chase, the Tahr hunter will be in awe of their climbing abilities in the steep New Zealand Alpines they call home. The Himalayan Tahr is close relative to the free range mountain goat. A Tahr has relatively short legs and small head with large eyes and small pointed ears. Their hooves have a flexible, rubbery core that allows them to grip smooth rocks, while a hard sharp rim can lodge into small footholds. Tahr inhabits steep broken mountainous landscapes ranging from 3000′ to 8000′ above sea level. Males are much larger and have different coloration and horn structure than the females. Adult Himalayan Tahr can weigh from 300 to 400 pounds and stand 2½ to 3 feet tall. The nannies (females) only weigh 45-55 pounds. This is one of the largest “pair” ratio differences between any mammals in the world. Himalayan Tahr are herbivores, subsisting on tall alpine “tussock” grasses and shrubs. Himalayan Tahr can be book your hunt found in herds from 2-25 animals and can live up to 14 years old in the wild. What makes a Trophy Bull Tahr? A Bull Tahr has horn bases of 8-9″ and a sharp round curled horn of 10 to 14 inches. A Tahr Hunter will judge a good trophy male by its long mane as well as its horns although record book your hunt book scoring only uses a combination of the base horn diameter and length of both horns. Most Tahr hunting guides will look for horns over 11 inches in length. Tahr horns of 12.5 to 13.5 inches are considered an above “trophy” average and horns over 14″ are exceptional. There have been a few New Zealand Tahr taken with horns over 15″ and these usually fall into the SCI Top 10 Record Category. When should I plan my Tahr Hunting Trip? Like Chamois hunting, Tahr Hunting can be done year. The ideal time to hunt Tahr is during New Zealand’s late fall and winter. By Tahr hunting in winter, the Tahr will have their winter coats and manes. A Tahr’s mane can grow 5-8″ in length from February to early June and turn darker in color. Late book your hunt May, June, July and August are ideal months to hunt Tahr and chamois. The Tahr rut runs late May thru July which usually correlates with the first snow of the season. The rut is an excellent time for Bow hunting. Tahr can be hunted in conjunction with the red stag “roar” or rut in March and April but the hunter will have to work harder to find a Tahr with a long mane at that time of year. The coats will also be lighter in color before winter sets in.